The Wait For It Podcast

International Feature: The Host

October 04, 2023
International Feature: The Host
The Wait For It Podcast
More Info
The Wait For It Podcast
International Feature: The Host
Oct 04, 2023

Get ready to be spine-tingled as we dissect the eerie details of Bong Joon-Ho's horror flick, "The Host".  We unpack the film's complex themes, scrutinize the stunning performance of lead actor Song Kang-ho, and marvel at Bong's masterful blend of horror and thriller elements. We also delve deep into character dynamics, analyze the film's pacing, shine a spotlight on the film's horror elements, and discuss how they compare to other monster movies. We keep our thoughts spoiler-free for the majority of this episode before transitioning into a brief spoiler discussion.

IMDb Synopsis: A monster emerges from Seoul's Han River and begins attacking people. One victim's loving family does what it can to rescue her from its clutches.

🔻You can find all important links for the podcast over at https://linktr.ee/waitforitpodcast (which includes our brand new Patreon site!)🔺

🔻BACKGROUND MUSIC PROVIDED BY: Ocean by KV https://soundcloud.com/kvmusicprod  Free Download / Stream: http://bit.ly/2OCvpHU Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/a8ctDtA7OK8 — Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported  — CC BY 3.0 🔺 

Enjoyed the episode? Have something to tell us? Text us here!

Gimme Three - A Series For Cinephiles

Gimme Three is a love letter cinema. 3 films. 1 Theme. A hell of a lot of fun!

Listen on: Apple Podcasts   Spotify

Support the Show.

The Wait For It Podcast +
Become a supporter of the show!
Starting at $3/month
Support
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Get ready to be spine-tingled as we dissect the eerie details of Bong Joon-Ho's horror flick, "The Host".  We unpack the film's complex themes, scrutinize the stunning performance of lead actor Song Kang-ho, and marvel at Bong's masterful blend of horror and thriller elements. We also delve deep into character dynamics, analyze the film's pacing, shine a spotlight on the film's horror elements, and discuss how they compare to other monster movies. We keep our thoughts spoiler-free for the majority of this episode before transitioning into a brief spoiler discussion.

IMDb Synopsis: A monster emerges from Seoul's Han River and begins attacking people. One victim's loving family does what it can to rescue her from its clutches.

🔻You can find all important links for the podcast over at https://linktr.ee/waitforitpodcast (which includes our brand new Patreon site!)🔺

🔻BACKGROUND MUSIC PROVIDED BY: Ocean by KV https://soundcloud.com/kvmusicprod  Free Download / Stream: http://bit.ly/2OCvpHU Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/a8ctDtA7OK8 — Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported  — CC BY 3.0 🔺 

Enjoyed the episode? Have something to tell us? Text us here!

Gimme Three - A Series For Cinephiles

Gimme Three is a love letter cinema. 3 films. 1 Theme. A hell of a lot of fun!

Listen on: Apple Podcasts   Spotify

Support the Show.

Speaker 1:

Welcome to your go-to source for entertainment. Wait for it.

Speaker 2:

Gaming. Wait for it. Anime Plus Ultra.

Speaker 1:

Mr Eric Almighty and Phil the Filipino. Yeah, they've got you covered, and all you gotta do is Wait for it.

Speaker 2:

Hey everyone, welcome back to the Wait for it podcast. I am your co-host, phil Smith, aka Phil the Filipino, and joining me, as always, is your other co-host, mr Eric Almighty. Eric, happy spooktober, happy birthday. Quote-unquote. For those of you that are listening, you can't see the air quotes we are recording here this evening on October 2nd, which is allegedly my co-host's birthday. I haven't seen any paperwork and I will get back to you guys on that, but nonetheless, I am excited to talk to you about this month's international feature. Of course, all throughout the month of October If you haven't seen our social media posts already we are going horror themed for the most part, aside from our very, very heavily anticipated episode of Creator Spotlight, but all three episodes here this month are going to be horror themed, thriller themed, something along those lines, and, eric, it's always one of my favorite times of the year. I know a lot of our listeners' favorite times of the year as well, so excited to get into this film as we return to our good, good friend Bong Junho.

Speaker 1:

Old, reliable, and I'm really excited to hear your thoughts on the movie. I think we're going to line up pretty closely on this one. I think we're a huge fan of this director's work and I think there's a lot of positive things to say. But out of all the ones we've watched, this one is interesting. I'm very curious where these topics are going to kind of bring us for this episode, and you know we'll keep everything spoiler free for the most part. There will be a clear transition to spoilers, which I'm excited to do. The good thing about this is we don't really talk about these movies beforehand outside of like little things here and there. I specifically refrain from messaging you because this movie kicks off right away. I had to really contain myself to not message you to be like what's happening.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, pretty much gets right to it. You get origin and then you get monster. So it's a, like Eric said, it gets right into it. So excited to talk to all of you about this film. It did come out in 2006. So we are going to take pretty much all any and all liberties talking about the plot. So you've had 17 years, just like us, to watch the movie, and it is available on Paramount Plus. If you don't want to pay for it, well, you have to pay for the subscription, but it's also available on other streaming sites if you want to, you know, rent it or buy it. So, very excited to talk about this here today, want to welcome in any brand new listeners that are checking us out for the very first time and for all of you returning listeners, as always, thank you so much for the continued support. But for any of you that need a little bit of a refresher on what international feature is, eric will let you know that right now, and then we will jump into this film.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so international feature really kickstarted our. It got kickstarted with our passion to dive into, like international movies, potentially shows, really just international media in general. I kind of thought about it, phil. I think that the origin point was around like parasite and like squid game. I mean there was a period between those two films and shows that you know it started to really come to the forefront. And we're going back to our roots with a Korean horror film called the Host that came out in 2006, 2007. So we're we're really dialing it back. We're going to one of our favorite directors. We've covered films talked about parasite, not on this series, but we did talk about Okcha on this series, which is a movie I think it relates to in a lot of ways. So I'm excited to talk about those parallels. And again, we will be talking about the plot freely, but we'll keep any amazing plot details that you know should be seen for the first time. We'll keep those under wraps until the spoiler warning is issued.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you know, one thing I definitely came away with here, eric, is that, as far as, like the Bong Joon-ho films that we have watched, I think probably the only major one that is left after this is probably Snowpiercer. So you know, we'll have that in our back pocket for down the line.

Speaker 1:

We have. We have flirted with that one for quite a while.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, definitely so. It is certainly on our drawing board, but we will, you know, save that for for another time. But one thing that I've kind of noticed as far as you know, Okja, Memories of Murder, Parasite, the Host they are all in some way shape or form their own type of horror, and while it's not horror in the forefront as we see it here in the West, it is a very nuanced and specific type of filmmaking that I would really like to see more, you know, and granted, I'm not actively going out Like we're not participating in Saw Patrol this weekend, guys, Sorry, you won't get a saw. Well, Eric might do a saw review eventually, but I'm not seeing Paw Patrol. I don't know if you are, Eric, I don't think so.

Speaker 2:

So I would know no Saw Patrol shirts from us. We we crossed the line at at Barbenheimer. I don't think that's ever going to be topped. So, in terms of traditional horror, you know we're not going to watch a whole lot of that. We are doing Nope next week on Late to the Party, super excited about that, aside from one very terrifying moment that I know for sure happens in the film.

Speaker 2:

But this is this, I think, a type of horror that I would like to see explored more here from filmmakers on our side, and this probably there, probably are. I just have to look for them, you know, we just have to seek them out a little bit more, which is nice that we have this platform to do so. Here's what I'll say I definitely enjoyed this movie, but I think I probably would have enjoyed it more with a little bit more context heading into it. Now, to give you guys a little bit of you know behind the scenes of our production, this month we did plan to watch a different movie. It didn't work out the way that we wanted it to, so we slid the host in because, again, it was a movie that had been on our, our Prolerton board for a very, very long time.

Speaker 2:

I think I definitely would have enjoyed it more knowing a little bit more backstory about what this film represents and, as all Bong Joon-ho films have a very, very layered meaning, right, and I think if I had known that a little bit more going into it, I certainly would have, I think, appreciated it more. Did you come out of that feeling that way? Were you able to do any additional research before we recorded? Because I had like a half hour to kill.

Speaker 2:

I don't know when you feel we both watched this movie today, just so you guys know Like a few hours ago, right yeah, so we didn't have a whole lot of time to prep, so interested to see what, like, your preparation process was as we led into this recording.

Speaker 1:

Honestly, outside of a trailer which I had already seen, I did want to go into this movie blind.

Speaker 1:

I caught on very quickly that this movie is going to have a lot of underlying themes like Okja.

Speaker 1:

So I was already kind of prepared and you know Bong Joon-ho is big on that and these underlying themes and messages throughout the film. I didn't really find it as a detriment to not know the context per se. I definitely dived into some of that context post movie so I did have some time after the film to be able to do that. But if anything and we'll kind of get to it I think those underlying messages do kind of take over the film at points, and not exactly for the betterment, and we'll kind of talk about some of those things where I think they didn't work as well as they did in a film like Okja, which, to be fair, he did that film well after this one. So again, I'm sure he learned a lot and you can really tell there's a lot of great elements of Bong Joon-ho here and he brings back some familiar faces, specifically the main actor on the film, Song Kang-ho, that we've talked about a couple times, and this is like the Martin Scorsese.

Speaker 2:

Leonardo DiCaprio parent.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's just what it is, and it's great.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, big, big fans of him and he was again really really solid in this, not that I was surprised whatsoever. Again, really, really enjoy seeing him any opportunity that we get, and they did a really good job, I think, as far as building sympathy for the character when at first you just think he's a loser right. So I think that was done very, very well. We also didn't give a synopsis for the movie. I'm going to give that to you guys right now. The host came out.

Speaker 2:

In 2006, following the dumping of gallons of toxic waste in the river, a giant mutated squid like creature appears and begins attacking the populace. Gongju's daughter, hyun-sio, is snatched up by the creature with his family to assist him. He sets off to find her. So wanted to give you guys that. But yeah, they did a very good job building empathy for that character. I think a lot of people could probably relate to being the sibling you know in the family. That's kind of like look down upon because they live their life a little bit differently. Eric and you know maybe this other siblings are more successful, which is really funny, because Eric's the opposite of that.

Speaker 1:

He's definitely like yeah, I'm like what the fuck was that about? Where did that come from?

Speaker 2:

But did a really good job building up those characters. I think definitely my two favorite characters in the film Well, I won't say my two favorite, but certainly my favorite character would be the daughter and then the relationship she builds with the other young boy that she meets throughout her journey, I guess you can say as far as what happens to her, those. That was the probably the the dynamic that I enjoyed the most, which is saying a lot because they don't really have a lot of, they're not building that relationship in dynamic locations right, so the fact that they were to pull that off Another part of the movie that I really enjoyed.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think the family and friend dynamic of it all really did work. I mean, we spend quite a bit of time with the main four characters that are, you know, ultimately trying to save the daughter, granddaughter, niece, right? So they're all in it and you definitely feel it. There's also some underlying tones of humor that I think work to break up the monotony of the film, which can get a little dark, but nothing too too crazy, I think in the horror genre. You know, a couple jump scares here and there and then you've got this monster which, in theory, you know fairly cool.

Speaker 1:

I think you know one thing we have to call out this is 2006,. 2007 visuals and, if I remember in the research I looked at, this was around that time where it like wasn't common to get like a lot of money towards these films, especially like Korean films, and it ended up being like a top or the top Korean film for a period as far as gross sales. So I mean, it's around this time where we really started to see an enhancement as far as quality. But yeah, for Korean films, I guess around this time that type of CGI was normal and it definitely was subpar, like you kind of had to suspend belief just a little bit.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's not great. I did actually watch a video, though that it is partial CGI and there are some practical effects. So they did build the head of the monster, which I, you know, I'm always a huge fan of. I love when they go practical. So I heard that he was very influenced by Jaws by Steven Spielberg. So yeah, you know it's not the best, but again, 17 year old film I actually read.

Speaker 2:

This is actually part of the thing that I kind of wish that I had known a little bit more. I read a. It was a non. Well, it was the part of the review that I read of towards the end was very spoiler-rific, but part of the review. That helped me a lot understand this film.

Speaker 2:

A lot more was from a user on Letterbox and I guess there was a time in the 80s after the Korean War where there was a huge boom of Americanized Hollywood style films in South Korea and then this film came out. Bong Joon-ho, you know, puts this film out as kind of a message for the people who are watching this film, a message to say, hey, stop obsessing over Americanizing our culture, you know, stop doing this. And those tones not looking back on it after reading that review are now very, very present, you know, throughout the entire film and that made me appreciate it a lot more. So it actually even raised my grade upon reading that and understanding it a little bit more. So the fact that they did go at least partially practical, when again it could have been super easy to just you know CGI, this whole thing I think was very I think the grossest part was like the tongue was controlled separately from the rest of us. I was like God, that's, that's gross and also great at the same time. I love that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and then there definitely are really good elements and I think when we talk about those themes, you know kind of transitioning into some things that maybe didn't work as well, like those themes were really present and help give like a tone to the movie, but there were times where they kind of like went off in that direction a little bit too much or not enough in some areas where it didn't really fit in with the film. Like, this movie is interesting film because it is and I feel like I just said this about the creator, which is out in theaters now a much different film. But this movie is two hours long and, like I said, with that film that's out now, it's somehow a little too long and also not long enough, which usually tells me that there's something with the pacing that was a little off. And there is a period in this film I would say maybe the beginning of the third act or the end of the second act that really does kind of drag. We kind of separate characters for the sake of some of those messages and I think the film suffers a little bit when it comes to that.

Speaker 1:

I think the perfect film for this is a nice brisk hour and a half. I feel like some of those messages and tones could have been delivered in a little bit less of the time. I'm not sure. If you felt that way, how did you feel like at the end of that two hour runtime?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's two hours is a is an easy ask, I think, when everything stays cohesive from beginning to end and, like you said, when they break the characters up. I honestly had to just double check because, you know, obviously we were watching it with subtitles I had to double check and make sure that I didn't look away and miss something Because the characters had been separated. I was like, has it been Months, days, year? Like how long have they been apart? And I just had to make sure that I hadn't completely missed something. And I didn't. So, yes, when they just make that decision and then kind of like, there's two escape from the hospital scenes in this one movie, right, did we need both of those? You know, I think the first one was solid and then the second one, I feel like we probably could have come up with something else. Now again, this is Bong Joon-ho's very, very early work, eventually. Well, memories of murder was even earlier and that's a masterpiece. So that's not a good Maybe that's not the greatest.

Speaker 1:

I literally was going to stop you. I was like, oh no, I thought that too, that's not the greatest I did.

Speaker 2:

I honestly thought memories of murder came after this. But yeah, so again, maybe leaning too much into the Americanization Hollywood style of monster movie. But yeah, there was a point there where I was like, did I, did I miss something? Like so I did have to go back and check that. Certainly not a bad movie whatsoever. But out of all the Bong Joon-ho films we have watched, this is my least favorite.

Speaker 1:

I would agree with that and it is a good film and I would actively recommend it to people, especially like. If you're interested in like horror films and and you know that that's a movie you probably haven't seen, you know you want to go outside your comfort zone a little bit. I would definitely recommend that there is something specific that the story suffers with. But I'm going to save that at least one conversation point for when we cut to spoilers, which we'll leave at the end. So we'll talk about kind of our grading, we'll talk about how it's been received on like rotten tomatoes, and then at the end we'll we'll talk about that and I'll circle back to a very important kind of a plot and character piece that didn't land with me. That did affect my score. So, with that being said, phil, a lot of great things about this movie I think we both are in agreeance our least favorite from this director, but it's impressive that this is the least favorite one that we have.

Speaker 1:

Like, compared to other movies, it's definitely right in the middle category. Like it is, it is a fine film. It's got the messaging, it's got the characters, it's got enough horror elements to keep you engaged. Again, this movie balls to the walls right away, so like it just jumps right into it, which did help, even though it does slow down, especially in that middle portion. Having an early start and a quick start definitely was helpful. Some of the visuals with the monster were unsettling, like the way it moved and then like that first shot that you see of it outside of the water and it's just running at the crowd of people was alarming. But the way it used its tail and like swung up onto things, that was I did not like that in a very creative way Like I liked it, but I didn't like it Very.

Speaker 2:

Scorpius Rex, unsettling. Scorpius Raptor, whatever it was called. Yeah, it was, which it's? I won't say it's a bummer because you know, maybe, maybe, what did I miss is going to get a revival soon, but I do. I do want to have a conversation with you about that camp Cretaceous continuation that for some reason they are deciding to do, but that is a conversation for another time. Yeah, I saw, I saw that Just feels like nevermind. Okay, anyway, but yes, very, very unsettling. I'm glad we.

Speaker 2:

I wanted to get your thoughts on that before we get to spoilers. And what did you? What did you think of the design? Because you know we are coming off of a great season. Shout out to Super Brackenbrows who did the Kaiju season.

Speaker 2:

I don't think this would have qualified. Obviously, a very, very much smaller monster would not have been in the tournament. Also would not have fared very well in any type of tournament, but against people that are certainly not prepared, it was. It was definitely a terror, but, yeah, really gross design, I think. Obviously the vision in of how it disposed of its captures was was very, very gross as well. So solid, solid film. It was very interesting to see how, you know, a South Korean monster film would do. You know, obviously Okja can kind of be classified as a monster film, but like we aren't, you know, but but in a we like Okja. You know, okja is obviously very, very cute and this thing is not whatsoever. So I mean, I will say, though it did kind of remind me of the green monster in the what was that monster movie? The animated film with Seth Rogen where he's like the blue blob and there is a monster versus aliens.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, there is a monster that kind of looks like this in monsters versus aliens, Isn't it the? The main one, the green one?

Speaker 1:

The green one? I don't think so. Monsters versus aliens.

Speaker 2:

I'm literally. I got to look it up because it's been a while. Is there a green one? Yeah, look at this one, the one.

Speaker 1:

It's like a like the sewer one. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

It kind of I wonder if they like took inspiration from this, because they looks that's kind of, unfortunately, what it reminded me of.

Speaker 1:

Okay, I don't think that's what it looked like at all, so I think I don't think you watch the same movie that I saw Seth Rogen wasn't in your movie, no, uh-oh. All I remember is when he's a blue blob and he walks by that person. Ooh.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, a movie did not leave many memorable moments, so I didn't think we would talk about monsters versus aliens. Here we are, here we are, so. But yeah, eric, if you do want to transition to that spoiler discussion, unless there's anything else that you wanted to mention, I think we've covered most of it.

Speaker 1:

No, I definitely think that this is a great opportunity to do that. Before we do that, though, Phil, I think it probably would be best that we give it a score, you know, for anybody that wants to drop off and stay spoiler free on this part. You know how did it do. You mentioned there's an interesting rod and tomato dynamic to this that. I'm excited to hear. I did not look at that prior to recording, so let's jump into that first, and then let's talk about our like letterbox scores.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, Really interesting. So 93% certified fresh on the tomato meter. As far as critics, 72% audience score. So 21% difference in terms of how audiences felt about it. And I would also again be curious to know how many of those reviews from Critics came, you know, after or post parasite. You know, people just going back and watching the library, which is exactly what we are doing as well. So, yeah, mixed reviews when it comes to the audience score, but still positive. You know, 72% is not necessarily bad. And then letterbox score. The average letterbox grade for the host is 3.8 stars out of five. So that is where people sat. I ended up giving this a three out of five. I was sitting at a two and a half, which again is just an average film, Still good, still watchable, certainly not that bad. But again, after I read the kind of the explanation of what the film represented, I did up it to a three.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, totally understandable. That's exactly where I landed. So three out of five on letterbox, that is my score as well, and again, it's a good film. It is a good film. Three is a movie I'd likely recommend, where anything under that is kind of subject to the person, to the situation. This I would just say if someone likes Korean films, someone likes horror films and or wants to see a mixture of both, they want to get out of their comfort zone and see something that has both of those elements. This is a great international feature and a good film in itself to recommend.

Speaker 1:

So, with that being said, this is our official spoiler warning. This part really won't be too long, so I think if you probably skip a few minutes ahead, you'll probably be safe. But, phil, there's one thing I want to talk about specifically, so to our audience. You have been warned spoilers. We're going to go into it and film the surprise at the end, I should say, or maybe the shock or twist, is that the daughter dies, which is who they were trying to go save this entire movie, and I think that element wasn't as fleshed out as much as I wanted it to be, because we essentially have this kind of like nice ending where this boy who doesn't have a family, doesn't have a home, he gets taken in and he's kind of like an adopted son and like I like the element of that.

Speaker 1:

But I wasn't. I wasn't attached to that relationship or that sacrifice. I just didn't buy into it. I don't understand why we split these characters up.

Speaker 1:

After the death of the father of the main character, the grandfather of the of the daughter they're trying to save, we just split these characters up all of a sudden. One of them gets knocked out, two of them get knocked out for a while, while the main character breaks out of the hospital for a second time Again, again. Why not flesh out that character dynamic, especially with the boy? If that's going to be kind of your good ending, that's going to be like your good feeling ending. I didn't quite buy it. And then throughout the entire film and this is kind of my last point on this with the daughter it felt like they had a lot more important things to do than to just go find her, like it just felt like there was just a lot of things happening, a lot of slow points where they just weren't going to look for her. And I know the main character is like presented as kind of a shit dad. That's also like his stick. You know, when we watch him in some of these films he plays a great shit dad.

Speaker 2:

It's not but. I hope he's a good dad in real life. He must be excellent, he must be an excellent dad in real life Probably is one.

Speaker 1:

But again, I just thought all those elements didn't quite work and instead of those character moments being built that's kind of to emphasize my point earlier we then focus more on the messaging of the film and I think that's where it loses such some of its luster. This could have easily been a three and a half, I think, despite the bad CGI and some of the pacing issues, but I just couldn't get over that, to be completely honest.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, we know we get a little bit of time with them in the sewer. I think there's like maybe two scenes where they are talking and that's pretty much it. You know, like, did we need the lengthened scene of the younger brother going into, you know, the corporate office and being chased? You know, did we need that? Do we need to see the sister getting just, you know, totally failing again and getting knocked into the sewer system and passing out? You know stuff like that. You know, could you have repurposed, like I said again, another breakout scene into something else, because we really didn't know too much about the boy except that he was poor and, you know, homeless and that was about it.

Speaker 2:

And listen, I think it's certainly to establish that the daughter has a really, really good heart and that's good. We want that because you know her father is carrying that on by continuing to take care of this little boy. But you have to for her to die. When you think that in the beginning of the movie, I was like, oh, is this going to be the crux of this? Is this like a revenge tale that she dies right in the beginning and then you find out that she has survived, you're like, oh, you know well, ok, great, let's see what this payoff is going to be Now. To be fair, none of these movies really have a good ending. You know what I'm saying. So this probably is the most positive out of all the ones that we have watched. Now that we think of it, because somebody did get saved. I was even going to throw a train to Busan in there. Nope, nothing.

Speaker 1:

No, don't bring that up.

Speaker 2:

Can't even think of any. Like all, the most of these movies have this type of ending, so really the fact that the host has the most positive one is pretty disturbing. But it was an interesting decision to make and, again, they could have spent that time elsewhere if they did want to commit to a two hour runtime, and it's. It's certainly muddy the the finale for sure.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and again, I think this is one of the reasons why we don't really watch horror films, like we're not horror film buffs. For this reason because, like the horror genre is not the place to go for like concrete storytelling. You know, like there's a lot of suspension of beliefs, especially in. I guess maybe I shouldn't just say horror films and then get shit on when someone is like, hey, how dare you? Like I really I guess mean monster films, because I don't think there's like a Oscar worthy, like amazing story, monster movie, unless I'm just not thinking of it.

Speaker 1:

Monster movies tend to be like, because you're suspending so much belief, I mean I guess they get a little bit of grace and that's not really why you're there. You're there for the kills and for some of the horror elements. So maybe that's a blanket statement, but that's the way I kind of look at monster films in general is, like they, I'm not there for the story, but for me story is a big part of it. Story and its characters are huge, and I just think that there's a little bit of a mismanagement of some of the core characters that are tied to the heart of this film, and I think that's ultimately what.

Speaker 1:

What brought it down from what could have been a three and a half, despite you know the fact that, again, it is a little outdated visually. There are scary elements. I can't believe I didn't bring this part up. So one of the visual elements that was terrifying and very well done was right at the beginning in the attack, when all those kids are in the fucking building and their hands are sticking out and the blood's coming down.

Speaker 2:

That's a good scene. That was haunting Mm. Hmm.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely haunting.

Speaker 2:

Steve Rogers trying to help everybody.

Speaker 1:

Yes, Steve Rogers himself that.

Speaker 2:

Steve Rogers. Pre serum, though, like it wasn't even the good Steve Rogers, it was just normal Steve Rogers.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, no, it wasn't. It wasn't great, but again, I really think that that scene was haunting and it was absolutely well done. So there are there are elements there that are really good.

Speaker 2:

Well, I mean, while we're on the topic of monster movies, is this better than the King of the Monsters? Godzilla? King of the Monsters.

Speaker 1:

What isn't better than Godzilla, king of the Monsters? That's. That's the real question.

Speaker 2:

Oh man, I am excited for the Monarch TV series though, so we'll see how that goes. But I don't think Godzilla is allowed to be in it, so we'll see how that. You know what's? You know what makes a good Godzilla show? No, god. So God, we want to.

Speaker 1:

we want to enjoy Godzilla so much. We just it just never happens. It's really one of the saddest things I do want to see Godzilla.

Speaker 2:

Minus one is what it's called. Minus one, negative one, something like that.

Speaker 1:

I still need to see Shin Godzilla. Yeah, so maybe we can go to Nakama. Who's doing a thing all my own free plug doing a thing all month long with horror films. So yeah, I think I saw Shin Godzilla was on there.

Speaker 2:

If I remember correctly, I think I think the night before Halloween, so October 30th. Wait for it. Hang out, Maybe we'll go to Nakama and have some pork. Oh man, sounds so good, let's go tonight. All right as well.

Speaker 2:

I think we have covered the host again. We certainly recommend the film. Just go into it. For those of you that are still here that stuck around for the spoiler part, you know, go into it with a an open mind. You know, obviously understand it was made in a very interesting time for South Korean film and you know a lot of those messages I think were were certainly very hit. But there are also some misses in this as well. And saying that this is the worst Bong Joon-ho movie and giving still giving it a three out of five is pretty impressive.

Speaker 2:

So, Snowpiercer, you're up next, we're coming for you eventually and we will go from there, but want to thank all of you for checking out this episode. Make sure you come back next week for late to the party, as we will be watching Nope, which I'm super excited to check out. And also, if you want to find all the rest of our content, click that link tree link in the show notes. You'll find all of our social media pages, most importantly TikTok and Instagram, to where you can find a lot of updates. If you want to support the show a little bit more, you can do a couple of things. You can head on over to Spotify or Apple Podcast. Leave that five star review. It is a great way to let podcast, to let those specific podcast outlets know that we are doing a good job and that we deserve a little bit more attention. And the second way, Eric will actually go over with you right now.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, you can go directly to our Buzzsprout website, which is also in that link tree, and you can support us directly there financially.

Speaker 1:

Or you can send those finances over to Patreon and get some exclusive perks where patrons like Briar and Stefan are supporting the show there, getting early access to episodes, exclusive clips and videos and much, much more that we plan to build on that platform as we go through. But if you're not able to support us in that way, you can always leave a like, a comment, share our content, and we also have a Discord that you can actively join through that link as well. So many ways to engage with the podcast. We are going to be doing some big things as we wrap up the year and especially for 2024 is going to be a big year for the show. We're excited to have you on board and until the next one, my name is Mr Eric Almighty. That is my co-host, philip Filipino, and don't forget that we release episodes every Wednesday here on the podcast and bonus content on platform like TikTok, and all you have to do is wait for it.

Speaker 2:

So I heard you're looking for a go-to source for entertainment. Wait for it. Gaming, wait for it. Anime Plus Ultra.

Speaker 1:

Mr Eric Almighty and Philip Filipino. Yeah, they've got you covered, and all you got to do is wait for it. This is the Wait For it podcast.

(Cont.) International Feature: The Host

Podcasts we love